Testing Tallulah

As I loaded my boat on to the car Friday night, thoughts of Oceana and Bridal Veil zoomed through my mind. I always have a strange mixture of fear and excitement when I’m about to run a new river. Running class 5 for your first time is like running your first river, you never know what can happen. I had many professional boaters tell me that I am completely ready for Tallulah, so in the back of my mind I knew I could do it, but fear is a hard thing to conquer. The whole ride to the river my dad and I were jittering with excitement. As we pulled into the parking lot, we saw how many people were there and felt a little bit more safe. So we geared up and got ready for the dreaded hike. As soon as I started down the stairs, I could already tell it was going to be horrible. The beautiful view of the gorge took my focus away from my burning calves. When I finally reached the bottom of the stairs, I couldn’t tell if my legs were shaking with excitement or pain. I watched a few people run the first rapid, and decided to hop in my boat. I ignored the shaking in my legs as I climbed in my kayak. As I launched into the water, I thought to myself, “Its now or never.” We chilled in the eddie for about 5 minutes to wait for a couple of friends, then we headed down. After watching my dads’ less than perfect line, I pealed out into the flow. I aimed in between two rocks in the center, and nailed my line. I immediately screamed with joy at the bottom of the rapid. The fear began to fade as I launched off of Tanners Boof, but I knew the fear would soon return when I see the next rapid. Sure enough, when I got out to scout Oceana, I went silent. I could not tell if I was scared, nervous, happy, or excited. All I knew was that I must run it. As I was watching people run it, Lance came up to me and asked, “Do you want me to portage it with you?”

“No way man, this is what I came here for!” I replied.

“Aw man! Now I have to run it, too!” Lance says. So we climbed in our boats together and pealed out. As I sat at the top, my mind went blank of everything except my line. I paddled up the rooster tail, and let myself fall. Nothing seemed to exist except for the massive fall in front of me. I noticed that I had a little bit too much left angle, but I didn’t have time to fix it. I slammed into ‘The Thing” and kept sliding my way to the bottom. I got hung up in the hole, but I rolled up and surfed out. I screamed with joy and hugged Lyle at the bottom. All of my fears were completely gone. It was the best feeling in the world knowing that I have conquered my greatest goal. I have been dreaming of this moment since I started kayaking. After watching the rest of my crew nail perfect lines, Luke came up to me and asked, “When did you get that giant dent in the back of your boat?” I must have done it when I hit the thing with too much angle. We all started laughing because it took us almost ten minutes to notice it. My dad said it gave my boat personality, but I thought it looked pretty stupid. After draining boats and watching a few more people run Oceana, we headed down river. Every rapid afterwards was filled with boofing and laughter. As the fear drained out of me, I started to loosen up. I noticed that my paddling was getting better when I was this calm. I was nailing all of my lines and having fun at the same time. I could tell that my dad was still pretty nervous after his skirt imploded at the bottom of Oceana, but everyone else seemed to be having a blast. Towards the end of the run, Dad began to loosen up too. Eventually, we were all messing around and having fun. When I hit the lake at the bottom, I couldn’t believe that I had just run Tallulah. I had a permanent smile for the rest of the day. I will never be able to describe how I felt that day.

Watch The Video Here!!! HsrDTP8S70w?list=UUjsbQpE2xfnw8vBqcFfA1NQ

Garrett Madlock 13

Jackson Kayak

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsrDTP8S70w[/youtube]

Testing Tallulah

As I loaded my boat on to the car Friday night, thoughts of Oceana and Bridal Veil zoomed through my mind. I always have a strange mixture of fear and excitement when I’m about to run a new river. Running class 5 for your first time is like running your first river, you never know what can happen. I had many professional boaters tell me that I am completely ready for Tallulah, so in the back of my mind I knew I could do it, but fear is a hard thing to conquer. The whole ride to the river my dad and I were jittering with excitement. As we pulled into the parking lot, we saw how many people were there and felt a little bit more safe. So we geared up and got ready for the dreaded hike. As soon as I started down the stairs, I could already tell it was going to be horrible. The beautiful view of the gorge took my focus away from my burning calves. When I finally reached the bottom of the stairs, I couldn’t tell if my legs were shaking with excitement or pain. I watched a few people run the first rapid, and decided to hop in my boat. I ignored the shaking in my legs as I climbed in my kayak. As I launched into the water, I thought to myself, “Its now or never.” We chilled in the eddie for about 5 minutes to wait for a couple of friends, then we headed down. After watching my dads’ less than perfect line, I pealed out into the flow. I aimed in between two rocks in the center, and nailed my line. I immediately screamed with joy at the bottom of the rapid. The fear began to fade as I launched off of Tanners Boof, but I knew the fear would soon return when I see the next rapid. Sure enough, when I got out to scout Oceana, I went silent. I could not tell if I was scared, nervous, happy, or excited. All I knew was that I must run it. As I was watching people run it, Lance came up to me and asked, “Do you want me to portage it with you?”

“No way man, this is what I came here for!” I replied.

“Aw man! Now I have to run it, too!” Lance says. So we climbed in our boats together and pealed out. As I sat at the top, my mind went blank of everything except my line. I paddled up the rooster tail, and let myself fall. Nothing seemed to exist except for the massive fall in front of me. I noticed that I had a little bit too much left angle, but I didn’t have time to fix it. I slammed into ‘The Thing” and kept sliding my way to the bottom. I got hung up in the hole, but I rolled up and surfed out. I screamed with joy and hugged Lyle at the bottom. All of my fears were completely gone. It was the best feeling in the world knowing that I have conquered my greatest goal. I have been dreaming of this moment since I started kayaking. After watching the rest of my crew nail perfect lines, Luke came up to me and asked, “When did you get that giant dent in the back of your boat?” I must have done it when I hit the thing with too much angle. We all started laughing because it took us almost ten minutes to notice it. My dad said it gave my boat personality, but I thought it looked pretty stupid. After draining boats and watching a few more people run Oceana, we headed down river. Every rapid afterwards was filled with boofing and laughter. As the fear drained out of me, I started to loosen up. I noticed that my paddling was getting better when I was this calm. I was nailing all of my lines and having fun at the same time. I could tell that my dad was still pretty nervous after his skirt imploded at the bottom of Oceana, but everyone else seemed to be having a blast. Towards the end of the run, Dad began to loosen up too. Eventually, we were all messing around and having fun. When I hit the lake at the bottom, I couldn’t believe that I had just run Tallulah. I had a permanent smile for the rest of the day. I will never be able to describe how I felt that day.

Watch The Video Here!!! HsrDTP8S70w?list=UUjsbQpE2xfnw8vBqcFfA1NQ

Garrett Madlock 13

Jackson Kayak

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsrDTP8S70w[/youtube]

Testing Tallulah

As I loaded my boat on to the car Friday night, thoughts of Oceana and Bridal Veil zoomed through my mind. I always have a strange mixture of fear and excitement when I’m about to run a new river. Running class 5 for your first time is like running your first river, you never know what can happen. I had many professional boaters tell me that I am completely ready for Tallulah, so in the back of my mind I knew I could do it, but fear is a hard thing to conquer. The whole ride to the river my dad and I were jittering with excitement. As we pulled into the parking lot, we saw how many people were there and felt a little bit more safe. So we geared up and got ready for the dreaded hike. As soon as I started down the stairs, I could already tell it was going to be horrible. The beautiful view of the gorge took my focus away from my burning calves. When I finally reached the bottom of the stairs, I couldn’t tell if my legs were shaking with excitement or pain. I watched a few people run the first rapid, and decided to hop in my boat. I ignored the shaking in my legs as I climbed in my kayak. As I launched into the water, I thought to myself, “Its now or never.” We chilled in the eddie for about 5 minutes to wait for a couple of friends, then we headed down. After watching my dads’ less than perfect line, I pealed out into the flow. I aimed in between two rocks in the center, and nailed my line. I immediately screamed with joy at the bottom of the rapid. The fear began to fade as I launched off of Tanners Boof, but I knew the fear would soon return when I see the next rapid. Sure enough, when I got out to scout Oceana, I went silent. I could not tell if I was scared, nervous, happy, or excited. All I knew was that I must run it. As I was watching people run it, Lance came up to me and asked, “Do you want me to portage it with you?”

“No way man, this is what I came here for!” I replied.

“Aw man! Now I have to run it, too!” Lance says. So we climbed in our boats together and pealed out. As I sat at the top, my mind went blank of everything except my line. I paddled up the rooster tail, and let myself fall. Nothing seemed to exist except for the massive fall in front of me. I noticed that I had a little bit too much left angle, but I didn’t have time to fix it. I slammed into ‘The Thing” and kept sliding my way to the bottom. I got hung up in the hole, but I rolled up and surfed out. I screamed with joy and hugged Lyle at the bottom. All of my fears were completely gone. It was the best feeling in the world knowing that I have conquered my greatest goal. I have been dreaming of this moment since I started kayaking. After watching the rest of my crew nail perfect lines, Luke came up to me and asked, “When did you get that giant dent in the back of your boat?” I must have done it when I hit the thing with too much angle. We all started laughing because it took us almost ten minutes to notice it. My dad said it gave my boat personality, but I thought it looked pretty stupid. After draining boats and watching a few more people run Oceana, we headed down river. Every rapid afterwards was filled with boofing and laughter. As the fear drained out of me, I started to loosen up. I noticed that my paddling was getting better when I was this calm. I was nailing all of my lines and having fun at the same time. I could tell that my dad was still pretty nervous after his skirt imploded at the bottom of Oceana, but everyone else seemed to be having a blast. Towards the end of the run, Dad began to loosen up too. Eventually, we were all messing around and having fun. When I hit the lake at the bottom, I couldn’t believe that I had just run Tallulah. I had a permanent smile for the rest of the day. I will never be able to describe how I felt that day.

Watch The Video Here!!! HsrDTP8S70w?list=UUjsbQpE2xfnw8vBqcFfA1NQ

Garrett Madlock 13

Jackson Kayak

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsrDTP8S70w[/youtube]

Testing Tallulah

As I loaded my boat on to the car Friday night, thoughts of Oceana and Bridal Veil zoomed through my mind. I always have a strange mixture of fear and excitement when I’m about to run a new river. Running class 5 for your first time is like running your first river, you never know what can happen. I had many professional boaters tell me that I am completely ready for Tallulah, so in the back of my mind I knew I could do it, but fear is a hard thing to conquer. The whole ride to the river my dad and I were jittering with excitement. As we pulled into the parking lot, we saw how many people were there and felt a little bit more safe. So we geared up and got ready for the dreaded hike. As soon as I started down the stairs, I could already tell it was going to be horrible. The beautiful view of the gorge took my focus away from my burning calves. When I finally reached the bottom of the stairs, I couldn’t tell if my legs were shaking with excitement or pain. I watched a few people run the first rapid, and decided to hop in my boat. I ignored the shaking in my legs as I climbed in my kayak. As I launched into the water, I thought to myself, “Its now or never.” We chilled in the eddie for about 5 minutes to wait for a couple of friends, then we headed down. After watching my dads’ less than perfect line, I pealed out into the flow. I aimed in between two rocks in the center, and nailed my line. I immediately screamed with joy at the bottom of the rapid. The fear began to fade as I launched off of Tanners Boof, but I knew the fear would soon return when I see the next rapid. Sure enough, when I got out to scout Oceana, I went silent. I could not tell if I was scared, nervous, happy, or excited. All I knew was that I must run it. As I was watching people run it, Lance came up to me and asked, “Do you want me to portage it with you?”

“No way man, this is what I came here for!” I replied.

“Aw man! Now I have to run it, too!” Lance says. So we climbed in our boats together and pealed out. As I sat at the top, my mind went blank of everything except my line. I paddled up the rooster tail, and let myself fall. Nothing seemed to exist except for the massive fall in front of me. I noticed that I had a little bit too much left angle, but I didn’t have time to fix it. I slammed into ‘The Thing” and kept sliding my way to the bottom. I got hung up in the hole, but I rolled up and surfed out. I screamed with joy and hugged Lyle at the bottom. All of my fears were completely gone. It was the best feeling in the world knowing that I have conquered my greatest goal. I have been dreaming of this moment since I started kayaking. After watching the rest of my crew nail perfect lines, Luke came up to me and asked, “When did you get that giant dent in the back of your boat?” I must have done it when I hit the thing with too much angle. We all started laughing because it took us almost ten minutes to notice it. My dad said it gave my boat personality, but I thought it looked pretty stupid. After draining boats and watching a few more people run Oceana, we headed down river. Every rapid afterwards was filled with boofing and laughter. As the fear drained out of me, I started to loosen up. I noticed that my paddling was getting better when I was this calm. I was nailing all of my lines and having fun at the same time. I could tell that my dad was still pretty nervous after his skirt imploded at the bottom of Oceana, but everyone else seemed to be having a blast. Towards the end of the run, Dad began to loosen up too. Eventually, we were all messing around and having fun. When I hit the lake at the bottom, I couldn’t believe that I had just run Tallulah. I had a permanent smile for the rest of the day. I will never be able to describe how I felt that day.

Watch The Video Here!!! HsrDTP8S70w?list=UUjsbQpE2xfnw8vBqcFfA1NQ

Garrett Madlock 13

Jackson Kayak

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsrDTP8S70w[/youtube]

Testing Tallulah

As I loaded my boat on to the car Friday night, thoughts of Oceana and Bridal Veil zoomed through my mind. I always have a strange mixture of fear and excitement when I’m about to run a new river. Running class 5 for your first time is like running your first river, you never know what can happen. I had many professional boaters tell me that I am completely ready for Tallulah, so in the back of my mind I knew I could do it, but fear is a hard thing to conquer. The whole ride to the river my dad and I were jittering with excitement. As we pulled into the parking lot, we saw how many people were there and felt a little bit more safe. So we geared up and got ready for the dreaded hike. As soon as I started down the stairs, I could already tell it was going to be horrible. The beautiful view of the gorge took my focus away from my burning calves. When I finally reached the bottom of the stairs, I couldn’t tell if my legs were shaking with excitement or pain. I watched a few people run the first rapid, and decided to hop in my boat. I ignored the shaking in my legs as I climbed in my kayak. As I launched into the water, I thought to myself, “Its now or never.” We chilled in the eddie for about 5 minutes to wait for a couple of friends, then we headed down. After watching my dads’ less than perfect line, I pealed out into the flow. I aimed in between two rocks in the center, and nailed my line. I immediately screamed with joy at the bottom of the rapid. The fear began to fade as I launched off of Tanners Boof, but I knew the fear would soon return when I see the next rapid. Sure enough, when I got out to scout Oceana, I went silent. I could not tell if I was scared, nervous, happy, or excited. All I knew was that I must run it. As I was watching people run it, Lance came up to me and asked, “Do you want me to portage it with you?”

“No way man, this is what I came here for!” I replied.

“Aw man! Now I have to run it, too!” Lance says. So we climbed in our boats together and pealed out. As I sat at the top, my mind went blank of everything except my line. I paddled up the rooster tail, and let myself fall. Nothing seemed to exist except for the massive fall in front of me. I noticed that I had a little bit too much left angle, but I didn’t have time to fix it. I slammed into ‘The Thing” and kept sliding my way to the bottom. I got hung up in the hole, but I rolled up and surfed out. I screamed with joy and hugged Lyle at the bottom. All of my fears were completely gone. It was the best feeling in the world knowing that I have conquered my greatest goal. I have been dreaming of this moment since I started kayaking. After watching the rest of my crew nail perfect lines, Luke came up to me and asked, “When did you get that giant dent in the back of your boat?” I must have done it when I hit the thing with too much angle. We all started laughing because it took us almost ten minutes to notice it. My dad said it gave my boat personality, but I thought it looked pretty stupid. After draining boats and watching a few more people run Oceana, we headed down river. Every rapid afterwards was filled with boofing and laughter. As the fear drained out of me, I started to loosen up. I noticed that my paddling was getting better when I was this calm. I was nailing all of my lines and having fun at the same time. I could tell that my dad was still pretty nervous after his skirt imploded at the bottom of Oceana, but everyone else seemed to be having a blast. Towards the end of the run, Dad began to loosen up too. Eventually, we were all messing around and having fun. When I hit the lake at the bottom, I couldn’t believe that I had just run Tallulah. I had a permanent smile for the rest of the day. I will never be able to describe how I felt that day.

Watch The Video Here!!! HsrDTP8S70w?list=UUjsbQpE2xfnw8vBqcFfA1NQ

Garrett Madlock 13

Jackson Kayak

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsrDTP8S70w[/youtube]

2014 APE’s Nolichucky Gorge 1st Timers Trip & Picnic Report

Noli Gorge paddlers ready for shuttle.  Photo by Dawn Berglund

Saturday, August 30, 2014, was the Appalachian Paddling Enthusiasts annual first timer’s trip on the Nolichucky River.  We had a hot and humid day with partly cloudy skies and temps in the high 80′s/ low 90′s for our river trips.  The river flow was a low 400 CFS on the Embreeville Gauge which made for a technical & tricky level for some of our Gorge first timers and returning paddlers.  We organized both a Nolichucky Gorge trip (Class III at this level) lead by several of our top gun APE’s and a Lower Nolichucky River trip (Class II) lead by Debbie Briscoe.

The Noli Gorge trip participates met up at USA Raft at the take-out to load up all of our boats on one of USA’s buses for a shuttle up to the put-in in Poplar, NC.  The group managed to load up all 29 boats on top of the bus and get rolling toward the put-in in less than an hour with all our gear!  An impressive feat by itself!  We had 29 total participates on the Gorge trip with 12 first timers (28 completed the run).  The gorge boaters split into 3 smaller groups at the put-in and paired up experience gorge boaters (Big Thanks to: Jeremy Gass, Ryan Shealy, Jennifer Bradley, Andrea Ramsey, Jamison Evans & Justin Tipton) to show lines and set safety for our first timers.  There were several swims, broaches, boat pins, a hike out from “On the Rocks” back to the put-in, a couple of scary moments and even a kayak wrapped around a rock from a pin at “Rooster Tail” during the trip, but thanks to good preparedness and safety from our leaders 97% of the paddlers in our group made it to the take-out after a rather slow and challenging day.  So the trip was not our best on the river, but it was somewhat expected with the low level.  We think the biggest take-away tip from all the incidents that went down during this trip is paddlers who want to take on the mighty Noli Gorge (despite the level) need to have good sense of how to complete a combat roll and have class III boat control skills to finish this run with style.  Overall many paddlers on the trip still said they had a good time, so it was good to know we had met our objective for many!

Noli Gorge paddlers at the put-in.  Photo by Wesley R. Bradley

The Lower Noli trip had a great turn out too despite the low level and holiday weekend!  Debbie led a group of 14 paddlers with 7 first timers on a run from the USA Raft Outpost to the parking area take-out near the Sawmill below Devil’s Looking Glass Rapid.  Good times were had by all on the Lower trip!  However we did have two paddlers, who were not part of the group, get in trouble by wrapping their recreational open kayak around a rock in the rapid above Chestoa.  A few of our APE’s aided them in rescue recovery of their craft and thankfully no one sustained harm from the incident.

Lower Noli paddlers at the put-in.  Photo by Dawn Berglund

After we got off the river and many lessons were learned the hard way, we met back up at the USA Raft Outpost to have a picnic dinner catered by Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen.  We all enjoyed some tasty fried chicken and fixings for the main course!  Some APE’s members brought some really good snacks and desserts to share with the rest of the group too!  After the meal many stayed around for fellowship and river tales to top off the day!

Jack D Nelson’s SUP view of  the APE’s Noli Gorge 1st Timers Trip in this video:

[youtube width="560" height="315"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_ppmHKdoMg[/youtube]

2014 APE’s Nolichucky Gorge 1st Timers Trip & Picnic Report

Noli Gorge paddlers ready for shuttle.  Photo by Dawn Berglund

Saturday, August 30, 2014, was the Appalachian Paddling Enthusiasts annual first timer’s trip on the Nolichucky River.  We had a hot and humid day with partly cloudy skies and temps in the high 80′s/ low 90′s for our river trips.  The river flow was a low 400 CFS on the Embreeville Gauge which made for a technical & tricky level for some of our Gorge first timers and returning paddlers.  We organized both a Nolichucky Gorge trip (Class III at this level) lead by several of our top gun APE’s and a Lower Nolichucky River trip (Class II) lead by Debbie Briscoe.

The Noli Gorge trip participates met up at USA Raft at the take-out to load up all of our boats on one of USA’s buses for a shuttle up to the put-in in Poplar, NC.  The group managed to load up all 29 boats on top of the bus and get rolling toward the put-in in less than an hour with all our gear!  An impressive feat by itself!  We had 29 total participates on the Gorge trip with 12 first timers (28 completed the run).  The gorge boaters split into 3 smaller groups at the put-in and paired up experience gorge boaters (Big Thanks to: Jeremy Gass, Ryan Shealy, Jennifer Bradley, Andrea Ramsey, Jamison Evans & Justin Tipton) to show lines and set safety for our first timers.  There were several swims, broaches, boat pins, a hike out from “On the Rocks” back to the put-in, a couple of scary moments and even a kayak wrapped around a rock from a pin at “Rooster Tail” during the trip, but thanks to good preparedness and safety from our leaders 97% of the paddlers in our group made it to the take-out after a rather slow and challenging day.  So the trip was not our best on the river, but it was somewhat expected with the low level.  We think the biggest take-away tip from all the incidents that went down during this trip is paddlers who want to take on the mighty Noli Gorge (despite the level) need to have good sense of how to complete a combat roll and have class III boat control skills to finish this run with style.  Overall many paddlers on the trip still said they had a good time, so it was good to know we had met our objective for many!

Noli Gorge paddlers at the put-in.  Photo by Wesley R. Bradley

The Lower Noli trip had a great turn out too despite the low level and holiday weekend!  Debbie led a group of 14 paddlers with 7 first timers on a run from the USA Raft Outpost to the parking area take-out near the Sawmill below Devil’s Looking Glass Rapid.  Good times were had by all on the Lower trip!  However we did have two paddlers, who were not part of the group, get in trouble by wrapping their recreational open kayak around a rock in the rapid above Chestoa.  A few of our APE’s aided them in rescue recovery of their craft and thankfully no one sustained harm from the incident.

Lower Noli paddlers at the put-in.  Photo by Dawn Berglund

After we got off the river and many lessons were learned the hard way, we met back up at the USA Raft Outpost to have a picnic dinner catered by Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen.  We all enjoyed some tasty fried chicken and fixings for the main course!  Some APE’s members brought some really good snacks and desserts to share with the rest of the group too!  After the meal many stayed around for fellowship and river tales to top off the day!

Jack D Nelson’s SUP view of  the APE’s Noli Gorge 1st Timers Trip in this video:

[youtube width="560" height="315"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_ppmHKdoMg[/youtube]

2014 APE’s Nolichucky Gorge 1st Timers Trip & Picnic Report

Noli Gorge paddlers ready for shuttle.  Photo by Dawn Berglund

Saturday, August 30, 2014, was the Appalachian Paddling Enthusiasts annual first timer’s trip on the Nolichucky River.  We had a hot and humid day with partly cloudy skies and temps in the high 80′s/ low 90′s for our river trips.  The river flow was a low 400 CFS on the Embreeville Gauge which made for a technical & tricky level for some of our Gorge first timers and returning paddlers.  We organized both a Nolichucky Gorge trip (Class III at this level) lead by several of our top gun APE’s and a Lower Nolichucky River trip (Class II) lead by Debbie Briscoe.

The Noli Gorge trip participates met up at USA Raft at the take-out to load up all of our boats on one of USA’s buses for a shuttle up to the put-in in Poplar, NC.  The group managed to load up all 29 boats on top of the bus and get rolling toward the put-in in less than an hour with all our gear!  An impressive feat by itself!  We had 29 total participates on the Gorge trip with 12 first timers (28 completed the run).  The gorge boaters split into 3 smaller groups at the put-in and paired up experience gorge boaters (Big Thanks to: Jeremy Gass, Ryan Shealy, Jennifer Bradley, Andrea Ramsey, Jamison Evans & Justin Tipton) to show lines and set safety for our first timers.  There were several swims, broaches, boat pins, a hike out from “On the Rocks” back to the put-in, a couple of scary moments and even a kayak wrapped around a rock from a pin at “Rooster Tail” during the trip, but thanks to good preparedness and safety from our leaders 97% of the paddlers in our group made it to the take-out after a rather slow and challenging day.  So the trip was not our best on the river, but it was somewhat expected with the low level.  We think the biggest take-away tip from all the incidents that went down during this trip is paddlers who want to take on the mighty Noli Gorge (despite the level) need to have good sense of how to complete a combat roll and have class III boat control skills to finish this run with style.  Overall many paddlers on the trip still said they had a good time, so it was good to know we had met our objective for many!

Noli Gorge paddlers at the put-in.  Photo by Wesley R. Bradley

The Lower Noli trip had a great turn out too despite the low level and holiday weekend!  Debbie led a group of 14 paddlers with 7 first timers on a run from the USA Raft Outpost to the parking area take-out near the Sawmill below Devil’s Looking Glass Rapid.  Good times were had by all on the Lower trip!  However we did have two paddlers, who were not part of the group, get in trouble by wrapping their recreational open kayak around a rock in the rapid above Chestoa.  A few of our APE’s aided them in rescue recovery of their craft and thankfully no one sustained harm from the incident.

Lower Noli paddlers at the put-in.  Photo by Dawn Berglund

After we got off the river and many lessons were learned the hard way, we met back up at the USA Raft Outpost to have a picnic dinner catered by Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen.  We all enjoyed some tasty fried chicken and fixings for the main course!  Some APE’s members brought some really good snacks and desserts to share with the rest of the group too!  After the meal many stayed around for fellowship and river tales to top off the day!

Jack D Nelson’s SUP view of  the APE’s Noli Gorge 1st Timers Trip in this video:

[youtube width="560" height="315"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_ppmHKdoMg[/youtube]

Reno HTTD #3 Floriston Race

Bad weather Wednesdays returned this week for the HTTD#3 held on the Floriston rapids.  We had 16 racers this time who navigated a fun course with one major move around a large midstream boulder requiring a full 360 degree path with several attainments.  As always the race was followed by Ninkasi brews in the parking lot where racers were part of a raffle for great prizes from our sponsors including: Jackson Kayak, IR, GoPro, Chaco, Rapid Transit, Kokatat, Astral, Ninkasi, Shred Ready, Stonyboater, Smith, and Mountain Khakis.

[vimeo]https://vimeo.com/94488355[/vimeo]

https://vimeo.com/94488355

Results

Jim         1:58

Sage      2:04

Mark     2:05

James   2:05.8

Scott      2:06

Claire     2:08

Cyrus     2:09

Ruth      2:11

Manny  2:11.9

Jon         2:13

Bob        2:14

David     2:18

Mary     2:40

Dan        2:44

Alex       3:00

Scott      3:10

Enjoy the Reno River Festival this weekend and join us in two weeks downtown for the last HTTD of 2014!!

Reno HTTD #3 Floriston Race

Bad weather Wednesdays returned this week for the HTTD#3 held on the Floriston rapids.  We had 16 racers this time who navigated a fun course with one major move around a large midstream boulder requiring a full 360 degree path with several attainments.  As always the race was followed by Ninkasi brews in the parking lot where racers were part of a raffle for great prizes from our sponsors including: Jackson Kayak, IR, GoPro, Chaco, Rapid Transit, Kokatat, Astral, Ninkasi, Shred Ready, Stonyboater, Smith, and Mountain Khakis.

[vimeo]https://vimeo.com/94488355[/vimeo]

https://vimeo.com/94488355

Results

Jim         1:58

Sage      2:04

Mark     2:05

James   2:05.8

Scott      2:06

Claire     2:08

Cyrus     2:09

Ruth      2:11

Manny  2:11.9

Jon         2:13

Bob        2:14

David     2:18

Mary     2:40

Dan        2:44

Alex       3:00

Scott      3:10

Enjoy the Reno River Festival this weekend and join us in two weeks downtown for the last HTTD of 2014!!

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